Answers to Quest on Vimarsh 1

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  syriac 2 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #152

    AdminCSEC
    Keymaster

    Members may post their answers to questions asked in the announcement in this thread.

    #264

    syriac
    Participant

    ANSWER TO PHYSICS 1

    The bug falls off when the normal force due to the sphere vanishes. This happens when the centripetal force (opposite to the normal force) is large enough (and equal to the normal force).

    Using this condition and the conservation of mechanical energy, one gets the angle at which the bug falls off as sin-inverse of (2/3) (approx. 41.80 degrees). (I am measuring the angle from the centre of the sphere with respect to the negative x-axis in the clockwise direction).

    _________________
    The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but ‘That’s funny…’

    – Isaac Asimov

    #265

    syriac
    Participant

    ANSWER TO Chemistry 1: Does an orbital exist if there is not an electron in it?

    I would say no. The orbital is not “a region where you can put electrons in” or a cloud or anything of that sort. It is a mathematical function (or more precisely, a state vector) that completely describes the state of the electron (excluding the spin). More specifically, an electron bound to an atom is allowed to be in a state of definite energy and angular momentum, and this state is what is known as the orbital. It corresponds to a state of the electron, and has no existence independent of the electron.

    Since the state is described completely only when you include the spin, and since electrons can have either up or down (1/2) spin, and since electrons are fermions obeying Pauli’s exclusion principle, an orbital can “hold” no more than 2 electrons. I’ve used incorrect terminology in the previous sentence; I should have said “No more than two electrons can be in the state described (incompletely) by a single orbital”

    To sum up, orbitals are not pockets of an atom in which you can drop electrons in, they are the descriptions of the states of an electron in the atom. No electron – no orbital.

    _________________
    The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but ‘That’s funny…’

    – Isaac Asimov

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